International Parasitic Plant Society

Welcome to the homepage of the International Parasitic Plant Society (IPPS). The IPPS is dedicated to advancing scientific research on parasitic plants. Our goals include increasing the understanding of these amazing plants, providing a platform for exchange among and beyond the scientific community as well as helping to decrease the crop damage inflicted by weedy parasitic plants.

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Most recent ‘Parasitic Plant’ publications

on the Web

Assessment of allelopathic influence of some cruciferous species on germination indicators of field dodder seeds K Almhemed, T Ustuner - Advances in Weed Science, 2024 - SciELO Brasil Tuesday 27 February 2024 Background Field dodder is a parasitic plant that has long been a concern in agriculture and natural ecosystems and a difficult plant to control. Objective This study aimed domain : www.scielo.br
ПРАВДА И ЗАКОН СИ СТРИГА, КИ ТИМОЩУК - ПРАВДА - elibrary.ru Monday 26 February 2024 - . domain : elibrary.ru
Agrobacterium-mediated Cuscuta campestris transformation as a tool for understanding plant-plant interactions S Adhikari, A Mudalige, L Phillips, H Lee, V Bernal… - bioRxiv, 2024 - biorxiv.org Saturday 24 February 2024 Cuscuta campestris, a stem parasitic plant, has served as a valuable model plant for Volatile chemical cues guide host location and host 490 selection by parasitic plants. domain : www.biorxiv.org
Identification and expression of strigolactone biosynthesis and signaling genes and the in vitro effects of strigolactones in olive (Olea europaea L.) A Özbilen, F Sezer, KM Taşkin - Plant Direct, 2024 - Wiley Online Library Friday 23 February 2024 Strigolactones (SLs), synthesized in plant roots, play a dual role in modulating plant growth and development, and in inducing the germination of parasitic plant seeds and domain : onlinelibrary.wiley.com versions : 2
Genetic characterization of local populations of sunflower broomrape with increased virulence and new sources of genetic resistance in sunflower B Fernández Melero - 2024 - helvia.uco.es Thursday 22 February 2024 Specifically, Orobanche cumana, commonly known as sunflower broomrape, is a most effective method of controlling this parasitic plant among others such as biological, domain : helvia.uco.es
Strigolactone biosynthesis in rice can occur via a 9‐cis‐3‐OH‐10′‐apo‐β‐carotenal intermediate JY Wang, GTE Chen, A Balakrishna, M Jamil… - FEBS Letters - Wiley Online Library Wednesday 21 February 2024 Mass spectrometry (LCMS) and Striga bioassay. We further validated the biological deficient mutant, which demonstrated increased Striga seedgerminating activity and domain : febs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com
io-Assay Screening of Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] Inbred Lines for Resistance to Striga [Striga hermonthica (Del.)] in Ethiopia Z Legesse, B Tesso, T Tadesse - Asian Journal of Research …, 2024 - globalpresshub.com Tuesday 20 February 2024 Stimulant of Striga. These genotypes also showed the lowest Striga germination Therefore, these sorghum genotypes were low in pre-attachment to Striga and are domain : globalpresshub.com
owards Striga-resistant Gene pool in Nigerian Pearl millet landraces D Maryam, E John, A Ignatius… - E3S Web of …, 2024 - e3s-conferences.org Monday 19 February 2024 Under natural Striga hermonthica infestation to identify sources of Striga resistance. 140 days after planting for Striga count, Striga vigour and Striga severity. Number of domain : www.e3s-conferences.org
microRNA‐encoded peptides inhibit seed germination of the root parasitic plant Orobanche cumana S Tourneur, JP Combier, S Plaza, S Muños… - Plants, People …, 2024 - Wiley Online Library Monday 19 February 2024 The root parasitic plant Orobanche cumana (sunflower broomrape) is one of the major miPEPs strongly inhibit the germination of broomrape seeds by regulating their miR domain : nph.onlinelibrary.wiley.com
(4Z)-Lachnophyllum Lactone, a Metabolite with Phytotoxic and Antifungal Activity against Pests Affecting Mediterranean Agriculture: A New Versatile and Easy … G Soriano, D Arnodo, M Masi… - Journal of Agricultural …, 2024 - ACS Publications Friday 16 February 2024 At the same concentration, the compound displayed radicle growth inhibitory activity of the root parasitic weeds Orobanche minor and Phelipanche ramosa higher than 70 domain : pubs.acs.org versions : 3
Mobile signals in plant parasitism A Greifenhagen - 2024 - opus.uni-hohenheim.de Thursday 15 February 2024 Exists in Striga, even though the parasite forms a terminal haustorium. Striga CLE2s are Similar to SBTs and KAI2ds from parasitic plants, P. japonicum and S. hermonthica domain : opus.uni-hohenheim.de
ccurrence and Effect of Dwarf Mistletoe (Arceuthobium Globosum and a. Vaginatum) in High-Elevation Forests in México JJ Aguirre-Zúñiga, RL Heredia-Bobadilla… - Available at SSRN … - papers.ssrn.com Monday 12 February 2024 Among the parasitic plants that affect coniferous forests in the United States, Canada Dwarf mistletoe is a hemi-parasitic plant that extracts water and nutrients from its host domain : papers.ssrn.com
SYNERGIZING SORGHUM AND COWPEA: UNRAVELING YIELD DYNAMICS IN STRIGA-INFESTED FIELDS HS Abdullahi, YB Musa - Research Journal of Agriculture and …, 2024 - kloverjournals.org Monday 12 February 2024 Of Striga, making it a formidable challenge for sustainable agriculture in the region This review delves into the economic and agricultural implications of the Striga menace, domain : kloverjournals.org
Weed and Striga Management in Pearl Millet Production Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa D Yonli, H Traore, BA Kountche - Pearl Millet in the 21st Century: Food …, 2024 - Springer Friday 09 February 2024 Few control options to weed/Striga in pearl millet develop pearl millet varieties resistant to Striga ecotypes; (3) level on Striga infection; and (4) Striga severity and domain : link.springer.com
hytochemical Investigation and in vitro Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities Evaluation of Erianthemum aethiopicum Wiens and Polhill T Gonfa, A Temesgen, T Kiros… - Journal of …, 2024 - Taylor & Francis Friday 09 February 2024 Background Erianthemum aethiopicum Wiens and Polhill (Loranthaceae) is a parasitic plant native to north eastern Africa and Ethiopia. In Ethiopia, it is traditionally used domain : www.tandfonline.com versions : 2

Most recent 'Parasitic Plant' publications

in Scopus

  1. Exploring the Protective Effect of Total Flavonoids from Semen Cuscutae on Ovarian Germline Stem Cells Based on Notch Signaling Pathway Yuan Li, Hanqian Du, Jiashan Li, Zehui Li, Li Guo, Panyu Xu, Ying Xu, Na Lin Stem Cell Reviews and Reports Thursday 29 February 2024 dc:description
  2. The penetration of sunflower root tissues by the parasitic plant Orobanche cumana is intracellular Marie Christine Auriac, Caitlin Griffiths, Alexandre Robin-Soriano, Alexandra Legendre, Marie Claude Boniface, Stéphane Muños, Joëlle Fournier, Mireille Chabaud New Phytologist, volume 241, pages 2326-2332 Tuesday 27 February 2024 dc:description
  3. From leaves to the whole tree: Mistletoe effects on the productivity, water relations, and demography of a Neotropical savanna tree Mateus Cardoso Silva, Grazielle Sales Teodoro, José Magno das Chagas Junior, Sara Souza Bastos, Joao Paulo Rodrigues Alves Delfino Barbosa, Evaristo Mauro de Castro, Marina Corrêa Scalon, Eduardo van den Berg Austral Ecology, volume 49 Monday 19 February 2024 Trees' responses to mistletoes occur at multiple organization levels (e.g., leaf, individual, population), yet integrating these multi-scale responses is still challenging. Here, we compared the traits of infected versus uninfected trees over multiple scales, from leaf anatomy and physiology to canopy allometries and individual growth rate and surv... Trees' responses to mistletoes occur at multiple organization levels (e.g., leaf, individual, population), yet integrating these multi-scale responses is still challenging. Here, we compared the traits of infected versus uninfected trees over multiple scales, from leaf anatomy and physiology to canopy allometries and individual growth rate and survivorship. We tested the hypotheses that mistletoes lead in the host (1) the production of leaves with a conservative resource-use strategy, (2) more mechanically stable canopies and (3) reductions in growth and survival probability in the trees they infect. We addressed these hypotheses in the widespread savanna tree Vochysia thyrsoidea and xylem-tapping mistletoe Psittacanthus robustus in the Brazilian Cerrado, a global biodiversity hotspot. We found that (1) mistletoe infection did not affect key traits associated with resource conservativeness, such as leaf mass per area (LMA) and carbon assimilation rates (A). Likewise, (2) hosts did not increase the mechanical safety of their trunks in response to mistletoe infection since infected and uninfected trees had a similar allometric scaling between height and crown volume against stem diameter. (3) At the population level, both the relative growth rate and survival probability decreased as the number of parasites increased. However, zero growth and a 50% chance of mortality were estimated to occur in a minority of heavily infected trees (>7 and 14 parasites, respectively). Our results challenge the idea that mistletoes have a ubiquitous negative impact on their hosts. We highlight, therefore, the need for clarifying the mechanisms that allow trees to maintain their functioning even in the face of mistletoe parasitism.
  4. Can amino acids be used to inhibit germination or deplete the soil seedbank of Phelipanche ramosa (L.) Pomel? Stéphanie Gibot-Leclerc, Fabrice Dessaint, Manon Connault, Rémi Perronne Journal of Plant Diseases and Protection, volume 131, pages 91-99 Saturday 17 February 2024 Phelipanche ramosa is a weed holoparasite which became a major agronomic problem for several crops in France. The yield and quality losses may be complete and lead to the abandonment of crops in the most infested fields. Chemical weed control using synthetic herbicides does not have a direct effect on this weed because the first half of its reprodu... Phelipanche ramosa is a weed holoparasite which became a major agronomic problem for several crops in France. The yield and quality losses may be complete and lead to the abandonment of crops in the most infested fields. Chemical weed control using synthetic herbicides does not have a direct effect on this weed because the first half of its reproductive cycle occurs on the root system of its host. The aim of this study is to contribute to the definition of an integrated weed management program of P. ramosa, especially focusing on the use of the possible direct effect of amino acids on seed of broomrapes as a potential biocontrol solution. We studied a set of 14 amino acids in in vitro conditions to investigate whether some amino acids can have an inhibitory effect on the germination of the P. ramosa seeds, whether this effect may be permanent after the removal of the amino acid, and whether some amino acids can cause a high dormancy or seed mortality rate. Our main results showed (1) a strong inhibitory effect of four amino acids on the seed germination concerning arginine, lysine, phenylalanine and tryptophan, and (2) that this effect appeared temporary for arginine and lysine, but permanent for phenylalanine and tryptophan. Our study thus highlighted the interest of phenylalanine and tryptophan as they caused both high inhibition of germination and high seed mortality of P. ramosa. Based on these results, we suggest three options for the use of these amino acids that could provide concrete answers to farmers.
  5. Element accumulation by the holoparasitic species Cuscuta planiflora from serpentines in Bulgaria Dolja Pavlova, Irina Karadjova, Aida Bani Ecological Research Saturday 17 February 2024 The holoparasitic species Cuscuta planiflora Ten. (Convolvulaceae) parasitizes the Ni hyperaccumulator Odontarrhena muralis (Waldst. & Kit.) Endl. and a non-hyperaccumulator, Sanguisorba minor Scop., in Bulgarian serpentine areas. This study investigated the host/parasite relationship to evaluate: (1) metal accumulation in different parts of the pa... The holoparasitic species Cuscuta planiflora Ten. (Convolvulaceae) parasitizes the Ni hyperaccumulator Odontarrhena muralis (Waldst. & Kit.) Endl. and a non-hyperaccumulator, Sanguisorba minor Scop., in Bulgarian serpentine areas. This study investigated the host/parasite relationship to evaluate: (1) metal accumulation in different parts of the parasite and the host and (2) its potential threat to Ni phytomining/agromining by suppressing growth of the hyperaccumulator. Elemental concentrations in soil, shoots, leaves, and inflorescences of the two host plants, and in shoots and inflorescences of the parasite, were determined. Elemental concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Ni, Cr, Co, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cd, and Pb were determined after microwave digestion using inductively coupled plasma—optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) under optimal instrumental parameters. Individuals of hosts, both infected and non-infected, differed in the concentrations of essential elements (P, K) and some micronutrients. Infected individuals of O. muralis showed lower Ni concentrations in shoots, leaves, and inflorescences compared to non-infected ones. Sanguisorba minor is an excluder plant with low tissue Ni concentrations. The parasite had higher P and K, and lower Ca, Mg, Ni, Zn, Co, and Mn concentrations, than the host. The highest Ni concentration measured in the shoots of C. planiflora was 279 mg kg−1, whereas that from S. minor was 29.9 mg kg−1. Element transfer from host to parasite appeared element-specific and after infection Ni concentrations in all organs and biomass of hosts were reduced. We conclude that infection by C. planiflora is a potential threat to use of O. muralis for Ni agromining.
  6. What explains the high island endemicity of Philippine Rafflesia? A species distribution modeling analysis of three threatened parasitic plant species and their hosts Jasper J.A. Obico, R. Sedricke C. Lapuz, Julie F. Barcelona, Pieter B. Pelser American Journal of Botany, volume 111 Friday 16 February 2024 Premise: Rafflesia are rare holoparasitic plants. In the Philippines, all but one species are found only on single islands. This study aimed to better understand the factors contributing to this distributional pattern. Specifically, we sought to determine whether narrow environmental tolerances of host and/or parasite species might explain their is... Premise: Rafflesia are rare holoparasitic plants. In the Philippines, all but one species are found only on single islands. This study aimed to better understand the factors contributing to this distributional pattern. Specifically, we sought to determine whether narrow environmental tolerances of host and/or parasite species might explain their island endemicity. Methods: We used Maxent species distribution modeling to identify areas with suitable habitat for R. lagascae, R. lobata, and R. speciosa and their Tetrastigma host species. These analyses were carried out for current climate conditions and two future climate change scenarios. Results: Although species distribution models indicated suitable environmental conditions for the Tetrastigma host species in many parts of the Philippines, considerably fewer areas were inferred to have suitable conditions for the three Rafflesia species. Some of these areas are on islands from which they have not been reported. All three species will face significant threats as a result of climate change. Conclusions: Our results suggest that limited inter-island dispersibility and/or specific environmental requirements are likely responsible for the current pattern of island endemicity of the three Rafflesia species, rather than environmental requirements of their Tetrastigma host species.
  7. Extracellular Self- and Non-Self DNA Involved in Damage Recognition in the Mistletoe Parasitism of Mesquite Trees Claudia Marina López-García, César Alejandro Ávila-Hernández, Elizabeth Quintana-Rodríguez, Víctor Aguilar-Hernández, Nancy Edith Lozoya-Pérez, Mariana Atzhiry Rojas-Raya, Jorge Molina-Torres, Jesús Alfredo Araujo-León, Ligia Brito-Argáez, Avel Adolfo González-Sánchez, Enrique Ramírez-Chávez, Domancar Orona-Tamayo International Journal of Molecular Sciences, volume 25 Friday 16 February 2024 Psittacanthus calyculatus parasitizes mesquite trees through a specialized structure called a haustorium, which, in the intrusive process, can cause cellular damage in the host tree and release DAMPs, such as ATP, sugars, RNA, and DNA. These are highly conserved molecules that primarily function as signals that trigger and activate the defense resp... Psittacanthus calyculatus parasitizes mesquite trees through a specialized structure called a haustorium, which, in the intrusive process, can cause cellular damage in the host tree and release DAMPs, such as ATP, sugars, RNA, and DNA. These are highly conserved molecules that primarily function as signals that trigger and activate the defense responses. In the present study, we generate extracellular DNA (exDNA) from mesquite (P. laevigata) tree leaves (self-exDNA) and P. calyculatus (non-self exDNA) mistletoe as DAMP sources to examine mesquite trees’ capacity to identify specific self or non-self exDNA. We determined that mesquite trees perceive self- and non-self exDNA with the synthesis of O2•−, H2O2, flavonoids, ROS-enzymes system, MAPKs activation, spatial concentrations of JA, SA, ABA, and CKs, and auxins. Our data indicate that self and non-self exDNA application differs in oxidative burst, JA signaling, MAPK gene expression, and scavenger systems. This is the first study to examine the molecular biochemistry effects in a host tree using exDNA sources derived from a mistletoe.
  8. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Psittacanthus schiedeanus (Cham. & Schltdl.) G.Don. (Santalales: Loranthaceae), the first plastome of a mistletoe species in the Psittacantheae tribe Saddan Morales-Saldaña, Emanuel Villafán, Antonio Acini Vásquez-Aguilar, Santiago Ramírez-Barahona, Enrique Ibarra-Laclette, Juan Francisco Ornelas Mitochondrial DNA Part B: Resources, volume 9, pages 5-10 Friday 16 February 2024 Psittacanthus schiedeanus (Cham. & Schltdl.) G.Don., 1834, is a mistletoe species in the Loranthaceae, characteristic of the canopy in cloud forest edges and widely distributed in northern Mesoamerica. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of P. schiedeanus, the first for a species in the Psittacantheae tribe. The circularized qu... Psittacanthus schiedeanus (Cham. & Schltdl.) G.Don., 1834, is a mistletoe species in the Loranthaceae, characteristic of the canopy in cloud forest edges and widely distributed in northern Mesoamerica. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of P. schiedeanus, the first for a species in the Psittacantheae tribe. The circularized quadripartite structure of the P. schiedeanus chloroplast genome was 122,586 bp in length and included a large single-copy region of 72,507 bp and two inverted repeats of 21,283 bp separated by a small single-copy region of 7,513 bp. The genome contained 112 genes, of which 96 are unique, including 65 protein-coding genes, 27 transfer RNA, and four ribosomal RNA. The overall GC content in the plastome of P. schiedeanus is 36.9%. Based on 43 published complete chloroplast genome sequences for species in the families Loranthaceae and Santalaceae (Santalales), the maximum-likelihood phylogenetic tree with high-support bootstrap values indicated that P. schiedeanus in the Psittacantheae tribe is sister to the tribe Lorantheae. The chloroplast genome provided in this study represents a valuable resource for genetic, phylogenetic and conservation studies of Psittacanthus species, and an important advance for unraveling the evolutionary history of these hemiparasitic plants.
  9. Screening pearl millet genotypes for resistance to Striga hermonthica and compatibility to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. strigae Armel Rouamba, Hussein Shimelis, Inoussa Drabo, Emmanuel Mrema, Prakash Irappa Gangashetty Crop Protection, volume 178 Thursday 15 February 2024 Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br., 2n = 2x = 14) is a nutritionally rich and climate-resilient food crop cultivated globally. It is a crucial staple crop in Burkina Faso and the dry Sahel region, encompassing Niger, Mali, and Senegal. However, the yield of pearl millet is relatively low in the region (<0.85 tons ha−1) due to Striga her... Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br., 2n = 2x = 14) is a nutritionally rich and climate-resilient food crop cultivated globally. It is a crucial staple crop in Burkina Faso and the dry Sahel region, encompassing Niger, Mali, and Senegal. However, the yield of pearl millet is relatively low in the region (<0.85 tons ha−1) due to Striga hermonthica (Sh) infestation, bird damage, insect pests, diseases, and low-yielding open-pollinated landrace varieties. The study aimed to screen genetically diverse pearl millet accessions for Sh resistance and compatibility to a Striga bio-control agent, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Strigae (FOS), to select contrasting and promising parents for resistance breeding and production. One hundred and fifty genotypes were evaluated in Sh hotspot fields in the rain-fed and greenhouse conditions using an alpha lattice design and two replications in Burkina Faso. Significant differences were recorded among the tested pearl millet genotypes for the assessed agro-morphological and Striga resistance. Days to flowering was significantly delayed in the assessed genotypes due to Sh infestation. Applying FOS on pearl millet seed significantly reduced the mean Striga number in Sh-infested conditions. The following genotypes: IP-3098, IP-6112, IP-9242, IP-10579, and IP-11358 were identified as exhibiting Sh resistance and were compatible to FOS. The pearl millet genotypes supported few to none Sh emerged plants with comparatively low values under the Striga number progress curve. The selected genotypes are useful parents to breed for Striga resistance and integrated management in Burkina Faso and related agroecologies.
  10. Structure, Function, and Application of Self-Healing Adhesives from Mistletoe Viscin Stephen D. George, Elias Andraos, Tobias Priemel, Nils Horbelt, Griffin Keiser, Ambrish Kumar, Christian Heiss, Notburga Gierlinger, Parastoo Azadi, Matthew J. Harrington Advanced Functional Materials, volume 34 Thursday 15 February 2024 Berries from the European Mistletoe (Viscum album) possess a sticky tissue called viscin that facilitates adhesion and germination onto host trees. Recent studies of viscin have demonstrated its adhesive capacity on a range of natural and synthetic surfaces including wood, skin, metals, and plastic. Yet, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly unde... Berries from the European Mistletoe (Viscum album) possess a sticky tissue called viscin that facilitates adhesion and germination onto host trees. Recent studies of viscin have demonstrated its adhesive capacity on a range of natural and synthetic surfaces including wood, skin, metals, and plastic. Yet, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, an investigation of the adhesive performance of mistletoe viscin is performed, demonstrating its hygroscopic nature and ability to self-heal following adhesive failure. It is identified that adhesion originates from a water-soluble adhesive component that can be extracted, isolated, and characterized independently. Lap shear mechanical testing indicates that the mistletoe adhesive extract (MAE) outperforms native viscin tissue, as well as gum arabic and arabinogalactan—common plant-based adhesives. Furthermore, humidity uptake experiments reveal that MAE can reversibly absorb nearly 100% of its mass in water from the atmosphere. In-depth spectroscopic and mass spectrometry investigations reveal a composition consisting primarily of an atypical arabinogalactan, with additional sugar alcohols. Finally, several proof-of-concept applications are demonstrated using MAE for hygro-responsive reversible adhesion between various surfaces including skin, plastic, PDMS, and paper, revealing that MAE holds potential as a biorenewable and reusable adhesive for applications in cosmetics, packaging, and potentially, tissue engineering.
  11. Understanding predictors of mistletoe infection across an urban university campus in Southwest China Yuchen Niu, Benjamin Laffitte, Sophia Zuoqiu, Barnabas C. Seyler, Zhengang Ha, Jianan Chen, Lei Chen, Ya Tang Urban Ecosystems Thursday 15 February 2024 Due to the importance of trees in urban ecosystems, it is crucial to understand the distribution, prevalence, and intensity of parasitic mistletoe infection across urban landscapes. In this study, we aimed to understand how various tree-related factors (e.g., tree taxonomy, size, pruning history, nativity, foliage, density, and diversity) might inf... Due to the importance of trees in urban ecosystems, it is crucial to understand the distribution, prevalence, and intensity of parasitic mistletoe infection across urban landscapes. In this study, we aimed to understand how various tree-related factors (e.g., tree taxonomy, size, pruning history, nativity, foliage, density, and diversity) might influence mistletoe prevalence and infection intensity across a typical subtropical urban greenspace. We surveyed 6,012 trees representing 96 species, 76 genera, and 44 families across a large, urban university campus in a major Southwest Chinese city. In total, we found 353 mistletoe host trees (prevalence: 5.87%), largely concentrated on the eastern part of campus, partially due to the proximity of waterbodies and a large adjacent greenspace, as well as higher tree density. To understand how predictors affected the prevalence and intensity of mistletoe infection, we used a hurdle model fitting our zero-inflated count data. Four independent variables significantly affected the prevalence of mistletoe infestation, with three demonstrating positive correlations (crown width, tree density, and tree diversity). One variable (evergreen foliage) negatively correlated with mistletoe prevalence. However, only one factor was found to significantly affect mistletoe infection intensity (crown width, positively). Due to the variety of ecosystem services mistletoes provide, more studies are necessary to assess the impact of various mistletoe management strategies, especially on urban biodiversity.
  12. Parasitic plants are one step ahead: Cuscuta responds transcriptionally to different hosts Manuel González-Fuente Plant physiology, volume 194, pages 609-611 Wednesday 14 February 2024 dc:description
  13. Design and evaluation of Cuscutae Semen health food formulae based on complex network-association rules-fuzzy combination Hongye Li, Axiang Yu, Mengyu Sun, Yan Zhang, Lingmei Kong, Mingxia Li, Chunyan Wang, Wei Liu, Qingyue Deng, Xianxian Li, Yingyu He, Gaimei She Chinese Traditional and Herbal Drugs, volume 55, pages 540-550 Wednesday 14 February 2024 Objective To analyze the formula rules of health food, Chinese patent medicines and prescription containing Tusizi (Cuscutae Semen), and obtain potential formulae with the function of relieving fatigue and enhancing immunity by data mining technology. Methods With the help of the special food information query platform of the State Administration o... Objective To analyze the formula rules of health food, Chinese patent medicines and prescription containing Tusizi (Cuscutae Semen), and obtain potential formulae with the function of relieving fatigue and enhancing immunity by data mining technology. Methods With the help of the special food information query platform of the State Administration of Market Supervision and Administration and the platform of Pharmaceutical Intelligence Network, the database of health food, traditional Chinese patent medicines and prescriptions containing Cuscutae Semen was collected and established. Using the complex network analysis, Apriori association rule algorithm, analytic hierarchy process (AHP)-criteria importance through inter criteria correlation (CRITIC) combination weighting algorithm, and self-organizing maps (SOM) clustering algorithm were carried out at the level of individual drugs, drug pairs, and drug groups, to study their formula rules and design new formulae. Using the fuzzy combination of technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS) and rank sum ratio (RSR) methods to sort and evaluate formulae. Results A total of 142 kinds of raw materials were collected from 45 health foods, 59 prescriptions, and 103 Chinese patent medicines. A total of 39 pairs of high-frequency drug pairs were obtained from Apriori association rules and eight categories of the raw materials with different weights were clustered by SOM clustering. Based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine, a total of 28 potential formulae were obtained. According to the Fuzzy set theory, the optimal formula was obtained as Cuscutae Semen-Shudihuang (Rehmanniae Radix Praeparata)-Duzhong (Eucommiae Cortex)-Huangqi (Astragali Radix). Conclusion This study took the medicinal and food homologous Cuscutae Semen as an example, with a focus on health functions of relieving fatigue and enhancing immunity, and combined data mining technology and traditional Chinese medicine theory to obtain the optimal formula, so as to provide new ideas for the formula design of traditional Chinese medicine health food.
  14. The associational effects of host plant and mistletoe functional traits on leaf herbivory in mistletoe Guo fa Su, Jin Chen, Ling Zhang Oecologia Wednesday 14 February 2024 Associational effects are a phenomenon in which herbivore damage on co-occurring plant species is influenced by neighboring plants. Mistletoes are a group of shrubs that obtain nutrients from host plants through haustoria. Despite the potential for mistletoe herbivory to be affected by associational effects with their hosts, the effects of host and... Associational effects are a phenomenon in which herbivore damage on co-occurring plant species is influenced by neighboring plants. Mistletoes are a group of shrubs that obtain nutrients from host plants through haustoria. Despite the potential for mistletoe herbivory to be affected by associational effects with their hosts, the effects of host and mistletoe functional traits on mistletoe herbivory have been largely overlooked. This study aimed to evaluate the associational effects of host plants and the direct effects of mistletoe functional traits on mistletoe herbivory. To achieve this, we measured leaf herbivory and leaf traits of three mistletoe species (Dendrophthoe pentandra, Scurrula chingii var. yunnanensis, and Helixanthera parasitica) and their associated 11 host species during both dry and wet seasons. Our results showed that leaf herbivory of D. pentandra and S. chingii var. yunnanensis differed significantly on their respective host species, but H. parasitica did not. The relationships between mistletoe and the paired host herbivory differed between seasons, with a stronger positive relationship observed during the dry season. Furthermore, significant relationships were observed between paired leaf carbon, leaf nitrogen, and condensed tannin in mistletoes and their host plants, indicating that host plants can affect mistletoes' leaf functional traits. A group of mistletoe leaf traits provided significant predictions for leaf herbivory: leaves with higher leaf thickness and leaf total nitrogen showed higher herbivory. Overall, our study reveals that mistletoe leaf herbivory is directly affected by its leaf traits and indirectly affected by host associational effects, primarily through changes in mistletoes' leaf traits.
  15. Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz. and Cuscuta chinensis Lam. extract relieves insulin resistance via PI3K/Akt signalling in diabetic Drosophila Yinghong Li, Ye Xu, Biwei Zhang, Zhigang Wang, Leilei Ma, Longyu Sun, Xiuping Wang, Yimin Lin, Ji an Li, Chenxi Wu Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine Tuesday 13 February 2024 Background and aim: Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is mainly characterized by insulin resistance (IR) induced by hyperglycaemia and insufficient insulin secretion. We employed a diabetic fly model to examine the effect and molecular mechanism of Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz. and Cuscuta chinensis Lam. (AMK–CCL) extract as traditional Chinese ... Background and aim: Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is mainly characterized by insulin resistance (IR) induced by hyperglycaemia and insufficient insulin secretion. We employed a diabetic fly model to examine the effect and molecular mechanism of Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz. and Cuscuta chinensis Lam. (AMK–CCL) extract as traditional Chinese medicine in treating IR and T2DM. Experimental procedure: The contents of the active ingredients (rhamnose, xylose, mannose, and hyperoside) in AMK–CCL extract were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Wild-type (Cg-GAL4/+) or diabetic (Cg > InRK1409A) Drosophila flies were divided into the control group or metformin group and AMK–CCL (0.0125, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1 g/ml) groups. Food intake, haemolymph glucose and trehalose, protein, weight, triglycerides (TAG), and glycogen were measured to assess glycolipid metabolism. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling was detected using fluorescent reporters [tGPH, Drosophila forkhead box O (dFoxO)–green fluorescent protein (GFP), Glut1–GFP, 2-NBDG] in vivo. Glut1/3 mRNA levels and Akt phosphorylation levels were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively, in vitro. Results: AMK–CCL extract contained 0.038 % rhamnose, 0.017 % xylose, 0.69 % mannose, and 0.039 % hyperoside. AMK–CCL at 0.0125 g/mL significantly suppressed the increase in circulating glucose, and the decrease in body weight, TAG, and glycogen contents of diabetic flies. AMK–CCL improved PI3K activity, Akt phosphorylation, Glut1/3 expression, and glucose uptake in diabetic flies, and also rescued diabetes-induced dFoxO nuclear localisation. Conclusions: These findings indicate that AMK–CCL extract ameliorates IR-induced diabetes via the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, providing an experimental basis for clinical treatment.

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